Famous Athlete Sticks His Neck Out to Stand Against Trans Athletes in Olympics

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Celebrities run the risk of being canceled, constantly. It takes little more than being seen walking on the wrong side of the street for the virtual tar and feathers (or torches and pitchforks, depending on your preference) to make a trash heap of some former media darling.

While some would point to an underground agenda, a puppet master pulling the strings, allowing those that will “play ball” to keep their power and prestige, it also seems likely that the fickle mind of the people is just having its will and its way on social media, and there’s no more pattern in the problems that many face in the public’s eye than there than just a matter of being affected by how the wind blows.

However, there is little more absolutely guaranteed to shoot a person in the stratosphere of cancelation than to in any way disrespect someone on the rainbow-colored alphabet of sexual orientation mumbo jumbo, but that’s just what iconic football player Brett Farve did, and the shock waves are still reverberating throughout his football-loving kingdom.

Farve is a legend, there’s no doubt about that, but he’s now put that status to the test because he made the seeming career suicidal “mistake” of speaking his mind, the mind of many Americans, and the reasonable response to the brave new world we’re in, saying that the Olympics shouldn’t allow biologically male transgender athletes to compete in women’s sports.

Farve made his comments on his podcast Fox News reported just days ago when former men’s weightlifter Laurel Hubbard being permitted to compete in the upcoming Olympic Games against biologically female competitors. The weightlifter hails from New Zealand and will be the first openly transgender athlete at the international games. “It’s a man competing as a woman,” Favre said, calling the move “unfair.”

“If I was a true female — I can’t believe I’m saying that — and I was competing in weightlifting and lost to this person, I would be beside myself,” said Favre. “It’s not fair for a man, even if this person wants to be a woman or feels compelled — if you want to become the opposite sex, that’s fine. I got no problem with it. But you can’t compete against — males cannot compete against females,” he said.

Men and women’s sports have been separate for obvious reasons, and allowing transgender athletes to compete in a class outside of that which was designated to them at birth is going to be great for those born as a man, but not so much for those born as women.

As conservatives, we’re hardly a feminist bunch at large, but we are for the most part understanding that women oftentimes are known to settle. They want “a seat at the table” or just to be acknowledged for their hard work. For someone born a woman, even being able to compete with the “big boys” would be an achievement the likes of which she might have dreamed of since birth. But what about in-kind comparison? What about knowing who is really the best? What about a woman having a safe space to get ready for or clean up after a sporting event where she actually had a chance to win?

Yes, maybe it would be exhilarating for some individuals born as a woman to compete with men, but the largest impact of men competing in women’s sports (physically, outside of the social and moral ramifications) is that women will never win in their own category again, and it will be the small exception, never the rule, for them to have even a snowball’s chance to win in the men’s competition. So essentially, we’ll be staring down the barrel of two men’s competition, and a bunch of women who are “just happy to be here.”

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